If you’ve just become a single parent, you might feel that your world has been turned upside down. It’s challenging, but there are things you can do to manage this big change in your life. Give yourself time, recognise what you do well, and ask for help when you need it.

First weeks as a single parent: feelings and challenges

When you become a single parent there’s plenty of change to cope with. You might be dealing with the reality of single parenting, or the challenges of co-parenting as you and your former partner adjust to the new situation.

The uncertainty can lead to all kinds of strong emotions. You might feel anger, sadness, frustration, fear, shock, guilt, regret and grief for the life you once had.

On the other hand, you might feel relieved, hopeful or excited about your new life. Some newly single parents say they feel liberated from the conflict and stress of negotiating with a partner.

It’s challenging – but it can also be a time for learning about yourself and finding new directions.

Focusing on your strengths, acknowledging how you’ve coped well with challenges in the past and setting realistic goals can all help boost your confidence and resilience.

I did grieve in the early days of separation, but got over it when I moved into my own home and established an independent life with my children. My children and I are very conscious of the benefits of a happy home life.
– Mel, 31, separated for four years and mother of two children

Tips for the early days of single parenting

To start with, it might be enough just to get by, doing what needs to be done and dealing with your emotions. It’s fine to stay in coping mode for a while. Here are some suggestions to help you get through the first days and weeks.

Reach out for support
Your family and friends can be lifelines. If you can’t get support from them, seek out other single parents, or neighbours. Try chatting to people at your child’s child care centre, playgroup or school, or your community health centre. You could try sharing ideas and experiences in our online forum for mums or online forum for dads.

Take time to adjust
Whatever your circumstances, the feeling of loss might be part of your experience. It’s OK to feel this way and to talk about it – it helps you to grieve.

Take it step by step
In the early days, don’t expect too much of yourself and your family. There might be some things that you don’t really need to think about right now. Or you might be able to put off some big decisions until things become clearer – for example, moving house.

Focus on what you can control
Some things will be outside your control, like what happens when your child is with your former partner. Save your energy to tackle the things you can influence.

Remember that you have choices
Even if you can’t change the situation, you might be able to change how you respond. For example, you can choose to behave well, even if your former partner behaves badly. You can choose to look after yourself and take a healthy path that will make a big difference to how you feel.

Go easy on yourself
It’s easy to start blaming yourself for everything that goes wrong. But you’re not a superhero, and no-one expects you to be. Be kind to yourself and acknowledge your progress whenever you can.

Think positively about the future
Allow yourself to dream a little about how you’d like things to be. Develop new goals for yourself and your child.

I must admit it was just such a relief when I left. I had spent so long walking on eggshells. I didn’t care how hard it was going to be to raise my kids – I just wanted to feel safe and find some kind of calm. Four years on, I am a hundred times stronger and no regrets.
– Lillian, 27, separated for four years and mother of three children

Thoughts from other single parents

The challenges of being a single parent change over time. You and/or your former partner might repartner, which will add a whole new dimension to your arrangements. And of course, children constantly grow and their needs change.

Other single parents have said:

  • ‘I’m able to instill a sense of values and responsibility, and be a positive role model to my children, without the conflict of another parent to deal with. Hard work? Yes. Lonely? Often. But easier? MUCH!’
  • ‘I feel our home environment is better than it was when I was married.’
  • ‘I’ve discovered my inner strength and trust in my abilities as a parent and as a woman.’
  • ‘I made sure I kept connected socially and made an effort to stay active.’
  • ‘I tried not to fixate too much on the relationship ending, and instead focused on a future with my kids.’
  • ‘I make my own decisions about my life now, and I feel more at peace.’
Video

Single parents

6:07

In this short video, single parents talk about their experiences of raising children alone. Parents share strategies for coping, being good role models, and getting support and reassurance from family and friends. Your parenting circumstances are less important than your ability to be there for your child.

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Last updated or reviewed
01-02-2016

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Raising Children Network is supported by the Australian Government. Member organisations are the Parenting Research Centre and the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute with The Royal Children’s Hospital Centre for Community Child Health.

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