In our pregnancy week by week guide, you can find out what to expect when you’re 9 weeks pregnant.

You at 9 weeks pregnant

Most women will start to put on some weight at this stage, which is normal. But most still won’t have a noticeable baby bump.

pregnancy illustration, week 9

Headaches are common. You can take paracetamol according to the instructions on the packet. Talk with your health professional if there are problems or changes that are really bothering you. You can also read more about health problems in pregnancy.

You’re more prone to dental infections during pregnancy, so take extra care of your teeth and gums. Use soft toothbrushes and dental floss. Consider seeing your dentist for a check-up.

Pelvic floor muscles
The pelvic floor is a group of muscles and ligaments that support the bladder, uterus and bowel. It’s recommended that all women exercise their pelvic floor muscles every day to prevent weakness and improve strength.

Keeping your pelvic floor muscles in good shape with pelvic floor exercises will help to prevent urinary problems like incontinence later in pregnancy or after the birth. Pelvic floor exercises can also help with labour and recovery after birth. Regular light exercise like walking can also help to strengthen your pelvic floor muscles.

Your baby when you’re 9 weeks pregnant

Your baby is tiny, but growing very quickly:
  • The embryo is about 1.7 cm long, from head to tail.
  • The head looks much more like a baby now, although it’s big compared to the rest of the body. The facial features are more defined. The external and middle ear are taking shape, but babies can’t hear until about 24 weeks.
  • Tiny blood vessels are visible underneath the embryo’s transparent skin.
  • Your baby’s skeleton is starting to form.
  • Arms and legs are longer and slightly bent. It looks a bit like your baby is hugging itself.
  • The umbilical cord and placenta are developing.

Next

10 weeks pregnant

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Last updated or reviewed
23-03-2016

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Raising Children Network is supported by the Australian Government. Member organisations are the Parenting Research Centre and the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute with The Royal Children’s Hospital Centre for Community Child Health.

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