In our pregnancy week by week guide, you can find out what to expect when you’re 30 weeks pregnant.

You at 30 weeks pregnant

Your blood volume has doubled. Your health professional will be checking your blood pressure at every antenatal visit.

You might be getting more heartburn and reflux, as baby takes up more and more space. And your breasts might still be getting bigger too.

You might be finding that your sleep patterns are disrupted – you’re waking in the night and can’t get back to sleep. It might help to know that this is common but tiring. Try to rest when you can during the day. 

pregnancy illustration, week 30

Car seats and restraints
Babies aged under six months must be seated in a properly fastened, adjusted and approved rear-facing child restraint. It’s illegal to travel with a baby in a car without one.

You might be able to hire an approved restraint from your local council, an ambulance service or a private company. Ask your midwife about options in your local area.

If you’re not planning to buy a car restraint, now’s a good time to book one for hire. It needs to be fitted correctly, which can be done at a local fitting station. Do this soon in case baby is born early. 

Your baby when you’re 30 weeks pregnant

This is what baby is up to:

  • Baby measures around 27 cm from head to bottom, and weighs about 1.3 kg.
  • Baby is growing important fat stores beneath its skin, making its skin look smoother.
  • The lanugo – fine covering of hair on your baby's body – is starting to decrease. But if your baby was born now, it would still have quite a lot of lanugo covering its body.
  • Some babies can suck their thumbs.

Next

31 weeks pregnant

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Last updated or reviewed
13-03-2016

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Raising Children Network is supported by the Australian Government. Member organisations are the Parenting Research Centre and the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute with The Royal Children’s Hospital Centre for Community Child Health.

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