In our pregnancy week by week guide, you can find out what to expect when you’re 27 weeks pregnant.

You at 27 weeks pregnant

You might start putting on a bit more weight. But remember that you don’t need to ‘eat for two’. The quality of food, not the quantity, is more important.

Because women gain weight at different rates and times, talk with your midwife or doctor about the best amount of weight gain for you during pregnancy. Your health professional might check your weight at pregnancy visits.

pregnancy illustration, week 27

Whooping cough immunisation
Whooping cough is a very contagious and dangerous illness for babies. To help protect your baby against whooping cough, it’s recommended that you have a whooping cough immunisation between 28 and 32 weeks of pregnancy. In Australia, this immunisation is free for all pregnant women in their third trimester. Your GP or midwife can organise it for you.

Breastfeeding
Health authorities and experts recommend breastfeeding your baby. It can really help if you know about breastfeeding before your baby is born. Our articles on breastmilk and breastfeeding attachment techniques are a good place to start.

Call your local Australian Breastfeeding Association on 1800 686 268 – they’ll be able to help you with information and support. Speak with your midwife or doctor as well if you have any questions or concerns about feeding. Your local child and family health nurse will also know lots about breastfeeding.

Your baby when you’re 27 weeks pregnant

Here is what’s going on with your baby:

  • Your baby is about 24 cm long from head to bottom, and weighs about 920 gm.
  • Your baby can open its eyes.
  • Your baby’s brain is starting to take more shape.
  • Your baby should be putting on lots of weight over the next month or so.

Next

28 weeks pregnant

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Last updated or reviewed
06-04-2016

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Raising Children Network is supported by the Australian Government. Member organisations are the Parenting Research Centre and the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute with The Royal Children’s Hospital Centre for Community Child Health.

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