In our pregnancy week by week guide, you can find out what to expect when you’re 26 weeks pregnant.

You at 26 weeks pregnant

You might be experiencing backache, Braxton Hicks contractions and vivid dreams.

You’ll be gaining weight, and your centre of gravity has shifted. This can sometimes make you feel a bit clumsy as you get used to doing things and lifting things in different ways. The way you walk might change slightly too.

pregnancy illustration, week 26

Blood group type test and Anti-D injection
It’s important to test your blood to find out your Rh type.

If you’re Rh-negative, and your baby turns out to be Rh-positive, this can cause serious health problems for your baby. But no-one knows what your baby’s blood type is until after birth. So if you’re Rh-negative, you’ll be offered a special injection called Anti-D at your 26-28 week antenatal visit and your 34-36 week visit.

You’ll also be offered Anti-D if you have a bleed during pregnancy. This reduces the risks of health problems.

After your baby is born, blood is collected from your baby’s umbilical cord and the Rh type is checked. You’ll have another Anti-D injection if your baby is Rh-positive.

Ask your doctor or midwife for more information.

Some women want only women health professionals to care for them during pregnancy, labour and birth. You can ask for a woman midwife or doctor, but it might not be possible to have one – especially if you or your baby need urgent or specialised medical attention.

Your baby when you’re 26 weeks pregnant

Baby:

  • measures about 23 cm from head to bottom, and weighs around 820 gm
  • can hear, see and taste
  • might move in response if you firmly run your hand over your belly
  • starts growing a lot of fat and muscle from about now.

Next

27 weeks pregnant

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Last updated or reviewed
14-12-2017

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Raising Children Network is supported by the Australian Government. Member organisations are the Parenting Research Centre and the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute with The Royal Children’s Hospital Centre for Community Child Health.

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